Have you seen the M.A.D. – H.O.P.E. Trusted Adult bus ad?

Connection Saves Lives: Youth Mental Wellbeing Webinar

From May 12, 2020, Washington State Essentials for Childhood lunchtime webinar series.

 

Decreasing depressive episodes and suicide attempts and completion are national goals in the HealthyPeople2020 plan and in the Health & Human Services Strategic Plan (https://www.hhs.gov/).

In Washington state, suicide is the second leading cause of death for teens 15 to 19 years old. According to the Washington Healthy Youth Survey (2018), 32% of eighth graders, 40% of 10th graders, and 41% of 12th graders felt so sad or hopeless for 2 weeks or more that they stopped doing their usual activities. 16% of 8th graders, 18% of 10th graders, and 18% of 12th graders reported making a suicide plan. (Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, https://www.k12.wa.us/ ).

Results from the Washington State Healthy Youth Survey show that youth mental health outcomes have gotten worse. From 2008 to 2018, an overall increase of 33% of youth reported feeling hopeless, an increase of 35% of youth reported suicidal thoughts and an increase of 39% of youth reported having a suicide plan ( http://www.askhys.net/).

In Whatcom County, WA, Whatcom Family & Community Network (WFCN), through programming of Whatcom Prevention Coalition (WPS) shared lived experience of addressing and promoting youth mental wellbeing and suicide prevention. The M.A.D.-H.O.P.E. (Making a Difference – Helping Other People Everywhere) Youth Suicide Prevention program, a partnership with WFCN, Bellingham Public Schools, Whatcom County Health Department and WPC was created with youth to address youth mental wellbeing through peer to peer interaction. Across nine years, M.A.D.-H.O.P.E. has developed curriculum for middle and high school youth and community audiences. In our work, we believe that “Connection Saves Lives!” (www.madhope.org).

In 2019, WPC was selected as one of five national pilot sites for the National Council on Behavioral Health’s (NCBH) Connected! Project. Connected! Focuses on youth engagement to address youth mental wellbeing peer to peer. Three Whatcom County young adults serve at national youth influencers as WFCN works to better engage youth in breaking down stigma, and providing resources and supports, especially for underserved youth who identify with four target populations: Rural youth, Native American youth, LQBTQ+ Youth and Hispanic/Latina/o/x youth.

The WPC/ M.A.D.-H.O.P.E. and Connected Team share about the county-wide efforts: A series of community conversations on youth mental health issues; a trusted adult campaign; new partnerships to grow community capacity and find solutions to the need for mental wellbeing supports as well as innovative youth-led efforts in school and community settings that open up new opportunities for resilience and hope for youth.

In this session, they share the journey, so far, to increase resilience and hope for youth and families on mental wellbeing and to balance this national concern with hope.

Presenters:

Wil Henkel, one of three Connected! Project National Youth Influencers with the NCBH at the WFCN pilot site, is freshmen at Western Washington University hoping to earn a degree in psychology at Fairhaven College. He is a M.A.D.-H.O.P.E. trainer and consultant for Bellingham Public Schools for a peer-centered outreach/peer-centered support program that was innovated by himself and fellow student and M.A.D.-H.O.P.E. volunteer during their senior year at Sehome High School. Wil is a youth advocate for mental wellbeing and youth engagement.

Lisa Moulds, M.A. WFCN, Prevention Program Manager, co-chairs the Whatcom Prevention Coalition and manages the M.A.D.-H.O.P.E. Youth Suicide Prevention partnership. Lisa’s relationship based approach to building resilience in community stems from expertise in developing community partnerships between University staff, students and Whatcom County social services and school district as director of WWU’s Center for Service Learning for 10 years. Prior to joining WFCN in 2017, she worked in the fields of domestic violence prevention, community information and assistance, and as a program manager within Woodring College of Education at WWU. Lisa is mother to Jamie, a freshmen at Arizona State University, who recently made the life transition from home to college, but now back to home–studying online thanks to COVID-19.

Danielle Humphreys, Youth Suicide and Mental Wellbeing Specialist is a recent addition to the WFCN/ M.A.D.-H.O.P.E. team. Danielle joined the M.A.D.-H.O.P.E. in October 2019 and brings a background in working with diverse youth in faith-based and environmental service settings. Danielle is a trainer and program manager and understands the protective factors associated with increasing wellbeing in the lives of youth. She is mother to three elementary aged school aged children, adapting to being at home for school for the remainder of the school year.

Kristi Slette, M.Ed, is Executive Director at Whatcom Family & Community Network, a community capacity building nonprofit focused on promoting wellbeing and convening & supporting neighborhoods and communities to build their capacity so children, youth and families thrive. Kristi is a leader and educator in the local social services field for the past 25 years. She’s served WFCN since late 2015. She is a trainer on NEARH (Neurobiology, Epigenetics, Adverse and Positive Childhood Experiences, Resilience and Hope) Sciences. She taught Human Services at WWU for 15 years, served as director of training with Washington Campus Compact; director of youth and volunteer services with the Mt. Baker Chapter of the American Red Cross, director of the Retired and Senior Volunteer program with Whatcom Volunteer Center and brings expertise in leveraging relationships and resources to improve capacity toward solving complex community problems. Kristi is mom to two children, ages 14 and 16, who feel the stress of not being able to be with friends, miss playing the sports they love and are figuring out how to self-motivate for academics when technology offers more enticing content and connection.

Job Opening: Mt. Baker Community Prevention Wellness Initiative Coalition Coordinator

JOB SUMMARY:

Administer and coordinate a prevention community-based program, including planning, development, implementation and evaluation of the program; facilitate the development and coordination of substance abuse prevention activities; develop and present prevention-related educational programs for community members and groups; stay updated on the latest substance abuse prevention research and provide up-to-date information to the public; facilitate the development, training and implementation of local community substance abuse prevention coalition, and collaborate with existing task forces as a resource or provider of technical assistance.

JOB FUNCTIONS:

  • Coordinate a local community coalition comprised of community members who represent a minimum of eight of the following sectors: Youth, Parent, Law Enforcement, Civic/Volunteer Groups, Business, Healthcare Professionals, Media, Schools, Youth-serving Organizations, Religious/Fraternal Organizations, State/Local/Tribal Governments,   Other Substance Abuse Organization (e.g., Treatment), Youth Treatment Professionals, and Mental Health Professionals; to encourage and facilitate their collaboration in efforts to prevent or reduce substance abuse;
  • Coordinate and provide comprehensive training to coalition members to build capacity for community-based, data-driven substance abuse coalition work;
  • Provide technical assistance and support to agency staff, volunteers, prevention contractors, service providers and community groups on topics such as the CPWI and prevention science (e.g., risk and protective factors, the Strategic Prevention Framework, relevant evidence-based strategies);
  • Oversee community coalition’s development of five-year prevention strategic plan within “Washington State Department of Social and Health Services’ Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery” (DSHS/DBHR) Community Prevention and Wellness Initiative (CPWI) Community Coalition guidelines and providing annual budget and action plan updates;
    • Conduct needs assessment and other techniques to identify community service needs with community coalition members;
    • Assist individuals and groups in developing risk and protective factor focused prevention plans, selecting research-supported prevention strategies, and developing appropriate evaluations;
  • Work cooperatively with additional community members and groups to develop and implement on-going evidence-based strategies which discourage use/misuse of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs;
  • Develop data collection instruments and monitoring and program evaluation policies and procedures to ensure program compliance with federal, state, and local guidelines;
  • Responsible for prevention contract monitoring and program outcomes;
  • Conduct on site-visits with subcontractor(s) to monitor program components for specific contract provisions and compliance;
  • Conduct participant surveys to evaluate community needs, contract compliance and strategy effectiveness;
  • Prepare summaries of prevention monitoring reports for the coalition and as needed;
  • Enter reporting data into required data systems within contractual timeframes;
  • Interpret complex and detailed federal and state regulations to ensure program and planning compliances;
  • Attend required DBHR meetings and training;
  • Engage with local media. Preparing press kits, soliciting media coverage and responding to media requests;
  • Plan, develop, implement and monitor media campaigns, social marketing initiatives in collaboration with CPWI statewide media initiatives;
  • Collaborate with key community stakeholders in the support and implementation of Community Prevention and Wellness Initiative.

WORKING CONDITIONS:

Work is performed primarily in office environments. Primary office in which employee maintains work space must be located within community served by coalition. Community travel is required to provide face to face communication with coalition members and to attend other community meetings and events, provide training and technical assistance and participate in coalition strategies and activities. Statewide travel is required occasionally. Attendance at meetings and prevention activities may require working evening and irregular hours. Access to guaranteed, reliable transportation is required. Occasional physical effort may be required to lift items weighing up to 50 pounds.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES:

  • Knowledge of and familiarity with the community served by the coalition;
  • Demonstrated ability to organize community groups and to work cooperatively with a variety of people and agencies, public groups and contract agency personnel;
  • Knowledge of principles of cultural competence, consequences of health disparities, and strategies to increase inclusivity in community outreach;
  • Understand the value of and strategies to include diverse members of the community in coalition-building and community outreach;
  • Ability to facilitate meetings that encourage participation and positive development, and to work cooperatively with public groups and contract agency personnel;
  • Knowledge of principles of effective leadership with demonstrated leadership skills;
  • Excellent research, analysis, writing, and communication skills involved in community and coalition development, planning and policy development, grant and report-writing, statistical data gathering and public speaking;
  • Understand existing alcohol and other drug abuse prevention systems and programs in state and county governments;
  • Successful experience developing and providing adult training programs;
  • Knowledge of basic principles of substance abuse prevention and treatment. Understand the continuum of care in substance abuse and addiction;
  • Proven ability to work independently and prioritize several on-going assignments within contractual requirements including deadlines;
  • Ability to work a flexible schedule and travel within the area served by the coalition with occasional state-wide travel.

 

Additional knowledge of: community organizing, fundamental public health principles and practices, techniques of behavior change, social marketing, health promotion and population-based prevention; program planning and evaluation methods.

Additional ability to: manage multiple time sensitive issues, adapt to changing circumstances and develop creative solutions; generate a shared vision for the community; generate and maintain enthusiasm for developing solutions and instill a sense of hopefulness for continued improvement of health outcomes; provide technical assistance through coaching, mentoring, training, delegating, and directing; establish effective working relationships with diverse communities, agencies and staff; communicate effectively both orally and in writing with tact, diplomacy and sensitivity; work independently and work effectively in teams and work groups.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS:

Possession of a valid driver’s license and an acceptable driver’s abstract is required prior to employment.

Current Certified Prevention Professional credential or ability to obtain within 18 months of appointment upon approval of related training plan.

Ability to pass Washington State Patrol Background check and any further established background requirements.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:
A Bachelor’s Degree in Human Services, Public Health, Behavioral Sciences or closely related field; or the equivalent combination of relevant education, training and experience. Two years of relevant experience that adequately illustrates the attainment of knowledge, skills, abilities and other requirements of the job listed. Familiarity with Washington State substance abuse prevention planning frameworks and programs preferred.

FUNDING & OVERSIGHT INFORMATION: This position is grant funded by Washington State Department of Social & Health Services (DSHS), Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR). The grant is managed through Whatcom County Health Department. The Employer for this position is Whatcom Family & Community Network (WFCN). A 501 (c) 3 not for profit organization. See the WFCN website at www.wfcn.org

COMPENSATION: DOE: Range: $22 to $28 hourly. Medical health benefits, vacation and sick leave.

Whatcom Family & Community Network is an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

To Apply: Send cover letter and resume to info@wfcn.org

Position Open Until Filled with Priority Deadline of 9/18 at 5 p.m.

Most Washington teens reject alcohol and other drugs

Most Washington teens reject alcohol and other drugs

Healthy Youth Survey explores attitudes and behaviors of middle and high school students

Contact: Kelly Stowe • Department of Social and Health Services • 360-902-7739 • Kelly.Stowe@dshs.wa.gov

OLYMPIA-Results for the 2016 Washington Healthy Youth Survey (HYS) show that teen rates of substance use in our state have remained mostly unchanged since the last survey was taken in 2014, and that most teens avoid alcohol, marijuana, tobacco and other drugs.

“The health, safety and economic impacts of substance use disorders affect many individuals, families and communities in our state, and a wide range of organizations at all levels are partnering to prevent them,” said Governor Jay Inslee. “A big thank you goes out to all of the students who took time out of their busy school days to take the Healthy Youth Survey. This survey provides crucial information on adolescent health, behaviors and perceptions. It helps us in making the right decisions to ensure that the next generation is the Healthiest Next Generation.”

The HYS is taken every two years by students in grades 6, 8, 10 and 12, who voluntarily answer a wide variety of questions about their health behaviors. In the fall of 2016, over 230,000 students in over 1,000 schools from 236 school districts in all 39 counties took part. The survey provides state and community organizations with needed information about which teen health issues to focus on.

One of the concerning changes since the last survey is that the percentage of 8th graders who believe there is great risk in using marijuana has declined from 53 to 48 percent. Since marijuana is now more visible in communities with advertising and retail stores, state and community organizations and schools have increased education and prevention efforts to discourage underage use. These efforts may be helping to prevent an increase in use, with 17 percent of 10th graders reporting use in the past month, which has not changed since 2014.

Preventing underage drinking has long been a statewide priority, and alcohol use by 10th graders has dropped by 12 percentage points since 2006. However, the number of students who use alcohol has not changed since 2014. In 2016, one out of five 10th graders (a total of about 16,737 students) drank alcohol in the past month. Alcohol plays a significant role in all three leading causes of death among youth: injuries, suicides and homicides.

The number of teens who said they drove a car after using alcohol or marijuana is cause for alarm. More than half (51 percent) of the 12th graders who reported marijuana use in the past 30 days said they had driven within three hours of using marijuana.

E-cigarette/vapor product use significantly dropped from 2014 to 2016, but remains a concern because of its prevalence and association with other tobacco and substance use. E-cigarette use in the past month among 10th graders dropped from 18 percent in 2014 to 13 percent in 2016. Over twice as many 10th graders reported vaping (13 percent) as smoking cigarettes (6 percent), and 65 percent of 10th graders who vaped reported using marijuana.

“Growing up is difficult. The issues facing our youth today are big and have serious life consequences. Parents, teachers and agencies all help guide youth when facing these challenges” said Pat Lashway, Acting Secretary for DSHS. “This information will help the ’helpers’ drive home the true impact of drugs on the young developing brains before it’s too late.” Because the teen brain is still developing, alcohol and other drug use can cause more severe and permanent damage compared to those who start using at age 21 and older. National data identifies the risks such as poor grades and not graduating, due to problems with memory and concentration; serious injuries and death from driving under the influence; unwanted and/or unplanned sexual activity; addiction; depression and anxiety with long-term use.

Parents and guardians are the number one influence on children’s decisions about alcohol and other drugs. All adults can help teens avoid the negative consequences of substance use by talking with them early and often about the risks, locking up any alcohol, marijuana or prescription drugs in the home, reminding them that most of their peers are making healthy choices, and having clear rules and consequences to discourage use. Visit StartTalkingNow.org for proven tips on how to talk, monitor and bond with teens. For more information about the survey, including other results and fact sheets, visit the HYS website.

Washington state is recognized nationally as a leader in supporting evidence-based prevention practices and collaborating with community-based prevention organizations. Survey results for mental health, nutrition, physical activity and school engagement will be analyzed and released over the next few months.

The survey is a collaborative effort between DSHS and the Department of Health (DOH), the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) and the Liquor and Cannabis Board (LCB). The results provide state and local organizations with needed information to plan, implement and evaluate publicly funded programs.

X